DIY Wall Cabinets with 5 Storage Options | Shop Organization


What’s up guys, I’m Brad Rodriguez from Fix This Build That and today I’m going to show you how to make DIY wall cabinets with five different storage options Stay tuned I’ll show you just how I did it I’ve had these cheap cabinets in my shop for years and they were great until this happened Yeah, they literally fell apart from the weight So I gave the cabinet a wooden peg leg to keep it from totally falling off the wall and I started building some new ones I wanted the new cabinets to be heavy-duty and able to hold a ton of weight So I’m using 3/4 inch Baltic birch plywood for the carcass and I’ll have a full half inch back to tie it all together I started by breaking down the plywood into the right widths for t he frame of the cabinets now labeling your parts Here is a great way to keep them organized, especially when you’re making two cabinets at the same time Which I affectionately dubbed Cabinet A and cabinet B The tops bottoms and sides are the same for both Cabinets and I cut them to width using my crosscut sled and a stop block on my fence One of the storage options for the cabinets is to make flexible cubby storage with removable dividers The slots are sized for quarter-inch plywood and I made the cuts in two passes using a test piece to get exactly the right fit from my plywood and After I knew the size of the slot I needed I started making slots into the plywood working my way from the outside In now on each pass, I would flip the board 180 degrees and make a cut on the opposite side So I was taken advantage of one set up to make two cuts. I work my way to the middle until I had all the slots cut then I just ripped the piece in half To get a bottom and center shelf for cabinet B I’m using pocket hole. Joinery for the cabinet frame in each top bottom in the center shelf for cabinet B He got pocket holes on the ends Before assembly the sides need a few more steps to be done So I’m attaching a half-inch back into a recessed groove or a rabbet on the sides I switched over to my dado blade and I made the rabbet cuts But this could also be made in two passes with a regular blade or with a router bit Again, I used a test cut here to make sure my setup gave a good fit then I made the cuts on the inside back edge of each side a several of the storage options come from different shelves in the cabinets and Drilling the Shelf pin holes. Now before assembly is much easier than after it’s together The cabinet B will have the modular cubbies that I cut the slots for earlier So the sides only need shelf in holes on the top portion above this inner shelf Cabinet a on the other hand will have adjustable shelving from the top to the bottom with a center divider to make half-width shelves I marked directly on the parts to keep everything straight and then I drilled holes the length of the left side. I repeated the process on the center divider and knocked out the whole row. Maybe just a little too quickly. I was about to flip this over and start the other side. I realize I just messed this up These holes are too low because this is actually going to have a top on it This can be inside make sure you don’t make that mistake So I need to cut a new piece and adjust all these holes up the thickness of the plywood Make sure you’re marking it and think about what you’re doing before you do it This time I factored it in the thickness at the top and offset the shelf pins though I did drill a few errant holes yet again. See if you can pick those out in the rest of the video. I Started to flip over the divider and use the Shelf pin jig on the other side Then I realized I could just drill straight through the holes that I’ve already done As long as your shelf pins stick into the wood less than 3/8 of an inch This works great and saves time not having to offset the holes on the other side. I finished up with the Shelf pins on the right side and I was ready for assembly The bottoms and tops are joined into the sides to keep a clean exterior for the cabin I used 1 and a quarter inch pocket screws and corner clamps to hold things tight while I secured the bottom to the side. i finished up the frame assembly for cabinet a attaching the top to the side and then putting the remaining side on securing everything with screws The key during assembly is just to make sure that the front faces are flush and that the corners are square The center divider for cabinet a went in next The divider was left slightly long so I could adjust for an exact fit when I had the frame assembled But I made sure to cut off the bottom of the center divider because I referenced all the Shelf pin locations off the top The divider was held in place flush with the back of the long clamp Then I pre-drilled through the top and bottom and secure it in place with one and a quarter inch screws checking for square as I went the cabinet be is assembled much the same way as cabinet a The only difference is having the center shelf instead of the center divider I used wooden spacers to get consistent spacing between the bottom and center shelf and attach everything together with pocket screws. I measured the cabinets and cut the backs the size from half-inch plywood and the back sit in that recess rabbet that I made earlier but they fully overlap the top and bottom I laid down a bead of glue all around the perimeter and then I secured the back on the cabinet be with brad nails on the Sides, then I followed up with running the quarter inch screws pre-drilled and screwed into the top and bottom Now all the interior shelves in cabinet a are made from half-inch plywood I ribbed a few strips to width on the table saw and then I cut them down to length based on my cut list If you want plans for this build I have a full cut list parts list and step-by-step instructions head to the link down in the description Or you can use the card above The right side shelves will just hold cans But the left side of the cabinet will hold spray cans so I mocked it up to see how the fit was But this wasn’t perfect since it covered up most of the label and the can had a tendency to roll So I went back to the table saw and I cut the shelves down about 3/4 of an inch and as a bonus I used the offcut as my spacer strips and this worked much better for visibility of the label now to fix the rolling I laid out five marks on the strip and I made some small notches on the back side of the Spacer strips with a chamfer bit this was enough to hold the cans in place and keep them from rolling Then I glued and nailed the strips to the shelves and moved on to the shelves and inserts for cabinet B At the top of this cabinet got a full length shelf I use 3/4 inch plywood for this one – perfect sagging since it runs the full width of the cabinet For the lower slots, I cut down quarter-inch plywood into a series of small panels that I’ll slide into place later to make the cubbies Now the last set of storage options are racks on the doors if you’re not ready to build new cabinets yet This could be a great way to add some storage to your current setup. Now each of these add-ons is made from half-inch plywood I made some slight modifications in the plans to help reduce weight even further after I built these I Cut all the pieces to size per my Cutlass to make four different size racks and holders To give the door acts a little refinement I laid out curve on the top corners of the sides using a small section of PVC pipe to trace a nice radius after that I taped each pair of sides together and cut the majority of the corner off at the bandsaw Then I went over to the spindle sander and sand it down to my line now This can easily be done with a jigsaw and a hand sander as well. I went through a progression of different assembly methods making these door racks until I landed on the best way I started off making the tall racks using a right angle block clamped down to my bench and I attached the sides in fronts with a 20-gauge pin nailer and glue but I realize the issue wasn’t so much to the support, but it was the strength of the joints So for the final two door racks I switched over to my 18 gauge brad nailer and I just held the parts in place using a right angle square in my hand Versus being locked down to a fixed reference and the Brad nails held together way better I was trying to hide the holes with the 23 gauge pin nailer, but it just isn’t beefy enough The last thing I need to make before assembly was the doors for the cabins I cut the doors from 3/4 inch plywood and I used the large sheet to get continuous grain between them To hold up to the extra weight of the door racks and the contents I’m using three hinges per door here I laid out the locations for the hinges on both the doors and the cabinet bodies per the mounting instructions I’m using these full overlay european-style door hinges Using a jig I drilled holes for the hinge cups on the doors at the marks that I’ve made earlier and I drilled two pilot holes for the screws These hinges fit right in the holes and they’re gonna stay concealed out of the way I drilled the three holes in each door, and then I moved over to the cabinet On the cabinet side. I used a template from the hinge packaging to layout for the mounting plates I’m Martha locations and drill pilot holes for installation. Later To give the cabinet some protection. I’m using Polycrylic from Minwax the sponsor of today’s video It’s a water-based durable protective finish that goes on easy with a foam brush and dries quickly I’ve been using this finish on all my shop cabinetry and I love the low VOCs in easy cleanup and I personally like the water-based Look on a light wood like birch versus the yellow look of oil I think it looks more modern in a bit less like pine You can find out more about the Minwax Polycrylic via the link below in the description In between coats I use a small section of craft paper or a brown paper bag to smooth the surface When the paper picks up this white, you know The finish is dry and ready for another coat and using that paper bag after the final coat Also knocks down any dust nibs for a smooth finish. I installed the door hardware and then I mounted all the door racks to the doors with small right angle brackets and screws Then I went back and unloaded Captain Ahab the pig leg and pulled down the old cabinets Mounting the new cabinets without the doors is way easier. So I hung those up and then put the doors on afterwards a Cabinet B holds a lot of my finishing supplies and the cubbies are great for storing stuff that wants to go everywhere Like rags and chip brushes and having a spot on the door for my nitrile gloves is sweet for that grab and go usage when I’m using stains, epoxy or finish and cabinet a is gonna hold all my finishes including the fresh supplies Minwax hooked me up with The half with shelves hold nine quart cans and twenty spray cans with room for taller items at the bottom The large door rack holds 16 pint cans or mason jars and the other door holds some caulk and some other small items You can mix and match any of these five storage options to build your own custom wall cabinet If you love this video, I’ve got another one queued up for you right there You can go check out if you want plants for this build There’s a link down below in the description o take you to my website where you can go check them out If you’re not subscribed to the channel already I’d love to have you as part of the team and until next time guys get out there and build something awesome

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Reader Comments

  1. Fix This Build That

    Plans to build the cabinets: https://fixthisbuildthat.com/wallcabinets
    And don't forget to subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/fixthisbuildthat?sub_confirmation=1

  2. michael wyles

    Beautiful Cabinet's and I'm glad you didn't use MDF or Particle board or some other fall apart crap so called wood by product that falls apart in a year. Thank you

  3. That's Byers

    Nothing better then knowing you don't have to waste time looking for what you need because its all organized and right where you can see it.

  4. Michael Randall

    hey, I'm curious how you came up with your design? Often times, I think the hardest part (at least for me) is coming up with the best, most functional design for a project like this. It'd be interesting to see the thought process and considerations you take, let alone how you developed the design. Great cabinets and appreicate the inspiration!

  5. Southern Style DIY

    Great build, as always Brad! Love the use of multiple solutions and options inside a couple of cabinets. Really gets you thinking about how to store shop supplies ideally, without restricting yourself later.

  6. Andrew Hunt

    I am glad you made a few mistakes it shows me that you are human and it shows me that I will make mistakes too I'm just a beginner just learning how to do a little woodwork skills in my spare time I'm going to be trying to build a shed outside my garden put my machines and my tools great video I've learnt a lot thank you very much keep the good work going

  7. Dave Rowe

    awesome as usual Brad – hey curious what table saw blade you use? is it a flat grind so you have flat bottom grooves for the plywood dividers etc…

  8. JMakes

    Great build Brad! As always so many really clever tips in there, like the chamfer bit to stop the spray paint bottles from rolling! Curious what clamps you were using at 3.37 though? Never seen corner clamps like that!

  9. Darryl Dawkins

    I've watched more than a few of these "how to build a cabinet" videos. It's become quite clear that they are all just infomercials for kreg disguised as how to vids lol.

  10. Adam Solomon

    Hello Brad! Love the channel, just wanted to ask, I've brought a wooden box for my fiancee and was thinking of staining it or varnishing it. What would you suggest? I've varnished in the past using synthetic brush and never seem to get a smooth finish. Thanks!

  11. Frederick Kaludis

    Like it, all my life I have been plagued by cheap particle board with knock down cabinet hardware you know the ones like they use on stereo cabinets that seem to have Murphy designed in so they fail only when their failure causes undue hardship on you or your loved ones. I’m sick and tired of designed failure have you noticed IKEA knock down cabinets don’t fail because they use real wood not particle board and when they do use particle board it’s used in a way that ensures they don’t contribute to the long term failure of the object they are used in!
    Rant complete!

  12. iHeart carpentry

    Thanks for the how to videos. I subscribed to your channel may I ask that you do the same for mine as I'm slowly building a following while posting how to woodworkimg and carpentry videos. Thanks on advance and happy holidays

  13. Ron Consumer

    Well, I'm glad I'm not the only one who made the mistake of being lazy and buying those big box store cabinets… Instead of just building them myself… great job… 👍👍👍👍

  14. Ilan David

    Hey Brad, I am about to get the plans and built this. I didn't quite see how you mounted the cabinets on the wall. Did you just fastened them into the studs? Do you have instructions included in the plans? Thanks!

  15. Shawn Geraghty

    Dude, I'm am now a subscriber, solely based on the fact that you showed a mistake! I'm an amateur, starting working wood about 20 years ago. I appreciated that you can show that mistakes happen. Most videos I see show only the perfect outcome. Kudos! Keep up the good work, and keep the videos coming.

  16. Kirtlon Cashie

    Great job sir love the way you gave detail info as you went along, I also noticed how simple your cross cut sled is. Do you have a plans or video on how you made it?

  17. Bill Cochran

    Baltic Birch is recommended for the 3/4" sheets, and I love working with it due to it's dimensional stability. In my town, sheets of Baltic Birch are only available in 5'x5' sheets. Would it be possible to provide cut sheets for 5'x5' sheets, rather than 4'x8' sheets with the plans I've purchased?

  18. Henry V.

    I like the build, but my only concern is having chemicals is a flammable cabinet. Not that is matters all that much. But I personally keep flammable liquids in a metal vapor sealed cabinet. Otherwise great build, I really like how flexible it is.

  19. agrafes6

    Nice build, but sorry geeza, I ain’t paying $9 to make it, I’ll just watch the build again in slow motion 😂🤣😂👍🏻🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿

  20. Tye Bear

    Hey Brad. Great vid, cabinets – and amazing shop!!! Wanting to get rid of my Costco metal shelves which take up too much floor space, I've been looking for a functional elevated setup for my garage wall and think yours fits the bill. Really like the doors and door spaces for all those pesky Rustoleum/wood stain/other cans. Question – you aren't glueing the corner carcase corner joints but are just pocket screwing them together – I thought glue and screw was always the mantra especially for cabinets that will sustain some weight? Your thoughts and thanks.

  21. timpgod

    Those are awesome.
    I hope to follow this for my future shop, once I get my shed fixed and sealed.
    And get a table saw…
    And get power out there… And… And…

    The list never ends. Lol. Great job bud

  22. hmmmm

    I like the build but your build always need some tool to build these cabinets need a bunch of tools just for cabinets in order to build them I would need to spend $200 just for a tools that can do 1 thing only it's not for the dyi person

  23. Jo Nathan

    Brad, have built your basic cabinet a few times now and love them as a starting point. My wife wants extra deep cabinets over washer and dryer but I’m concerned about strength as the cabinet gets deeper. Any insight into how deep you can make this design before you just make it to weak to hang well? I get that there are about a million and one variables here but curious if you have any thoughts on the matter. Thanks.

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